There are several things that need to be done to correctly dress for outdoor activities such as skiing or snowboarding. These tips can be used for other outdoor activities as well.

1) Next to skin: The main job of this layer is to wick sweat away from your skin, then dry quickly so you don’t get chilled. Cotton sucks at this because it takes forever to dry. My favorite base layers are wool. They are very efficient, warm when it’s cold, cool when it’s hot, and they don’t stink up like so many synthetics do. The con is that wool tends to dry slowly when it gets wet (either from precipitation or sweat). Synthetic materials (polyesters) also make good base layers, and people with very sensitive skin often find wool itchy, so poly is a good wicking, quick-drying option. Perhaps the best of all are wool/synthetic blends which are becoming more and more popular because they have the quick-dry ability of synthetics, with the warmth and ant-stink talents of wool. A note about fit: For cool or cold weather, your base layer should be snug, because if it’s not touching your skin, it can’t wick sweat. That means your sweat sits on your skin until it evaporates, which leaves you shivering

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For the bottoms I prefer 3/4 long underwear, the reason is that in a ski or snowboard boot I only want my foot and a sock in the boot. If your long underwear goes to the ankle then you add an extra layer that can cause a preasure point and cut off circulation to your feet causing you to have cold and painful feet.

2) Insulation: This is the layer that traps your body heat. It can range from lightweight fleeces and wool sweaters to full-on puffy down jackets; it just depends on the season. In all but the coldest of weather, your insulation will remain in your pack while hiking, so your body heat can escape and dissipate. But as soon as you stop moving, put it on so you won’t get cold as your sweat dries.

There are many different types of insulation layers, in really cold climates you may need to add multiple insulation layers. The puffy layers are great at trapping your body heat. Fleece is another great option to keep you warm. When skiing I will start with a fleece and add a down puffy if it gets really cold.

3) Shell: The job of a shell is twofold: it cuts the wind and keeps you dry. In summertime, you can get away with a wispy windshell, but for more challenging weather and extended trips, you want a waterproof/breathable shell (like Gore-Tex or eVent) that keeps water out, but lets sweat vapor escape, so you don’t get wet from perspiration inside your layering system.

– See more at: http://www.backpacker.com/gear/experts/ask-kristin/how-do-i-layer-for-cold-weather/?utm_source=newsletter01&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter01#sthash.AccRE0lq.dpuf

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